ANDRASSY STREET

andrassy street

ANDRASSY STREET

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For a long time only insignificant houses and small gardens stood here, and in the second half of the 19th century, Prime Minister Gyula Andrássy decided to build a new avenue.
After the Revolution of 1848-1849, the statesman fled to Paris, where the ladies affixed the name “the beautiful hanger” (le beau pendu). On his return home, he received an amnesty and described an important political career. The idea and designs for the trip were mainly from Paris, but the designers were Hungarian or foreign architects. Over the course of a few years, the luxurious route, which has grown out of nowhere, has become a symbol of the country’s strength and the era of “happy peace.” At first, the route was covered with wooden cubes and was well accessible by carriages, pedestrians and riders.
Elegant shops, luxurious palaces, ornate gardens are and still are today. Its most important building is the Hungarian State Opera House designed by Miklós Ybl, but here you will find the Art Nouveau building of the Paris Grand Store, the House of Terror Museum, the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, the Liszt Ferenc Memorial Museum and the Ferenc Hopp Asian Art Museum. The route is divided into three sections, the boundaries of which are marked by an octagonal octogon and a circular Kodály circular. The 2300-meter-long avenue runs Europe’s third oldest underground railway, with elegant stops favored by locals and foreigners alike. Andrássy Avenue is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.